Have pest problems with scorpions? Learn all about these birds, including the different species of these eight-legged pests you may find near your home or business and your options to trap and eliminate scorpions from your property.

  • Scorpions might be one of the oldest land animals, as evidence suggests that this creature ventured to land around 420 million years ago

  • Scorpions are not insects; they are, in fact, arachnids and in the same family as spiders, mites, and ticks

  • They dance before mating as a courtship ritual

  • Scorpions glow in UV light

  • They go nearly a year without food by lowering their metabolism

  • Their venom has been used for medical purposes, such as treating certain cancers, antibacterial remedies, and even treatment for arthritis

  • Unlike most arachnids that lay eggs, they give birth to live young




Scorpions are arachnids. They are close relatives of ticks, mites, and spiders. There are approximately 1,300 species of scorpions worldwide. Scorpions are characterized by an elongated body and a segmented tail that is tipped with a venomous stinger. Scorpions are very common in the Southern and Southwestern United States.

Arizona Desert hairy scorpions are the largest scorpions in North America. Due to its large size, this scorpion feeds on a wide variety of prey such as lizards, snakes, and even other scorpions. This species gets its name from the brown hairs on its body, and these hairs are used to detect vibrations in the ground. 

Arizona Hairy Scorpions

What You Need To Know About The Arizona Desert hairy scorpion

  • What do Arizona Desert hairy scorpions look like?

    • Average length of 5.5 inches 

    • Beige or tan coloring 

    • Darker brown coloring on the top of the body

    • Eight legs

    • Crab-like pincers

    • Brown hairs covering the body

  • What do Arizona Desert hairy scorpions eat?

    • Preys on large insects such as spiders 

    • Also eats vertebrates such as lizards and snakes 

  • Where do Arizona Desert hairy scorpions live?

    • Range includes southern California, southern Nevada, southwestern Utah, and Arizona

    • Usually dig burrows

What You Need To Know About The Arizona Desert hairy scorpion

  • What are the signs of an Arizona Desert hairy scorpion infestation?

    • There are no real distinct signs from these scorpions that would indicate an infestation, but you can use blacklight at night to find these creatures as their exoskeleton reflects UV light

  • Why do Arizona Desert hairy scorpions invade my home or business?

    • Availability of food such as crickets, spiders, and cockroaches

    • Sheltering opportunities due to opening in the property or outdoor landscaping that offers protection from the elements

    • Water and moisture accessibility, any standing water can be an attractant for scorpions

  • How do I get rid of Arizona Desert hairy scorpions?

    • Place traps along the baseboards of your home or business

    • Place traps in other areas of the home or business that you might think are entry points for scorpions

    • Call in a pest control expert

Tips To Prevent The Arizona Desert hairy scorpion Infestations

    • Regularly check for scorpions using a blacklight 

    • Set sticky traps, such as the Kness Stick-All® Glue Trap, around your home

    • If other insects are present on the property, attempt to control those pests as well

    • Remove moisture around the property

    • Seal any gaps that your home or business may have with weather stripping or caulk

Found in the Sonoran Desert in the southwestern United States, the Arizona bark scorpion is a small, light-brown species that is one of the most prevalent species in the country. Even though these scorpions are small and are preyed on by a wide variety of other animals, these scorpions are very hardy. During U.S. nuclear testing during the cold war, these scorpions were found close to ground zero of bomb tests with no signs of adverse effects. They are the most venomous scorpion in North America.

Arizona Bark Scorpions

What You Need To Know About Arizona bark scorpions

  • What do Arizona bark scorpions look like?

    • Light-brown coloring

    • 2.75-3.14 inches long (females are larger than males)

    • Eight legs

    • Long pincers 

    • Glow under blacklight

  • What do Arizona bark scorpions eat?

    • Prey on small and medium-sized animals

    • Beetles, spiders, crickets, cockroaches, and other insects

    • Will eat other scorpions 

  • Where do Arizona bark scorpions live?

    • Their range includes Arizona, southern California, and western New Mexico

    • Hide during the day, typically under rocks, wood, or tree bark

    • Commonly found in homes with its range

What You Need To Know About Arizona bark scorpion Infestations 

  • What are the signs of an Arizona bark scorpion infestation?

    • There are no real distinct signs from these scorpions that would indicate an infestation, but you can use blacklight at night to find these creatures as their exoskeleton reflects UV light

  • Why do Arizona bark scorpions invade my home or business?

    • Availability of food such as crickets, spiders, and cockroaches

    • Sheltering opportunities due to opening in the property or outdoor landscaping that offers protection from the elements

    • Water and moisture accessibility, any standing water can be an attractant for scorpions

  • How do I get rid of Arizona bark scorpions?

    • Place traps along the baseboards of your home or business

    • Place traps in other areas of the home or business that you might think are entry points for scorpions

    • Call in a pest control expert 

Tips To Prevent Arizona bark scorpion Infestations

    • Regularly check for scorpions using a blacklight 

    • Set sticky traps, such as the Kness Stick-All® Glue Trap, around your home

    • If other insects are present on the property, attempt to control those pests as well

    • Remove moisture around the property

    • Seal any gaps that your home or business may have with weather stripping or caulk

Even though this scorpion is commonly called the “Florida Bark Scorpion,” the species Centruroides gracilis is not native to the state of Florida–it was an introduced species. This scorpion is native to Mexico, Guatemala, and Belize. Today, they can be found in several countries such as Cuba, Panama, Columbia, Jamaica, and Ecuador. The Florida Bark Scorpion is sometimes kept as a pet.

Florida Hairy Scorpions

What You Need To Know About Florida bark scorpions

  • What do Florida bark scorpions look like?

    • 2 to 4 inches long (females are larger than males)

    • Yellowish, brown, and reddish-brown coloring

    • Darker on the top portion of the body

    • Thin crab-like pincers

    • Eight legs

  • What do Florida bark scorpions eat?

    • Prey on small and medium-sized animals

    • Beetles, spiders, crickets, cockroaches, and other insects

  • Where do Florida bark scorpions live?

    • Commonly lives under rocks and tree bark

    • When invading a home, these scorpions can be found in walls or under piles of material in the yard

What You Need To Know About Florida bark scorpion Infestations 

  • What are the signs of a Florida bark scorpion infestation?

    • There are no real distinct signs from these scorpions that would indicate an infestation, but you can use blacklight at night to find these creatures as their exoskeleton reflects UV light

  • Why do Florida bark scorpions invade my home or business?

    • Availability of food such as crickets, spiders, and cockroaches

    • Sheltering opportunities due to opening in the property or outdoor landscaping that offers protection from the elements

    • Water and moisture accessibility, any standing water can be an attractant for scorpions

  • How do I get rid of Florida bark scorpions?

    • Place traps along the baseboards of your home or business

    • Place traps in other areas of the home or business that you might think are entry points for scorpions

    • Call in a pest control expert 

Tips To Prevent Florida bark scorpion Infestations

    • Regularly check for scorpions using a blacklight 

    • Set sticky traps, such as the Kness Stick-All® Glue Trap, around your home

    • If other insects are present on the property, attempt to control those pests as well

    • Remove moisture around the property

    • Seal any gaps that your home or business may have with weather stripping or caulk

Remove Their Food Source

Although general pesticides do not stop scorpions from entering your home, they can help get rid of the smaller bugs that act as a food source.

Try the Stick-All

Glue traps, like Kness’ Stick-All® Glue Trap, can be placed near cracks and crevices, wall voids, electrical fittings, around doors and window frames to catch scorpions.

Eliminate Nesting Spots and Points of Entry

Remove outdoor harborages such as piles of trash, stones, boards, firewood on the ground, and landscape timbers.

You should seal points of entry into buildings. Caulking may be applied around entry points in siding, windows, doors, pipes, and wires.

Available from Kness

Stick-All® Mouse & Insect Trap Products Stick-All® Mouse & Insect Trap

The ultimate glue trap for pest control. Attracts, monitors and catches multiple mice and insects.

View Stick-All® Mouse & Insects Traps

Available from Kness

Stick-All® Glue Trap Products Stick-All® Glue Trap

Ultimate in glue trap for pest control. Attracts, monitors and catches multiple mice and insects.

View Stick-All® Glue Traps