Scorpion Facts

Scorpions are arachnids. They are close relatives of ticks, mites and spiders. There are approximately 1,300 species of scorpions worldwide. They are characterized by an elongated body and a segmented tail that is tipped with a venomous stinger. Scorpions are very common in the Southern and Southwestern United States. Most scorpions in the United States are not poisonous, except for two species found in the southwestern states of Arizona, California, New Mexico, and Texas. Scorpions are commonly thought of as desert animals, but in fact, they inhabit many other habitats as well. These include grasslands and savannas, deciduous forests, pine forests, rainforests and caves. Scorpions are nocturnal, predatory animals that feed on a variety of insects, spiders, centipedes, and other scorpions.

The larger scorpions occasionally feed on vertebrates, such as smaller lizards, snakes, and mice. They locate prey primarily by sensing vibrations.

Although scorpions are equipped with venom to defend themselves, scorpions fall prey to many types of creatures, such as centipedes, tarantulas, insectivorous lizards, birds (especially owls), and mammals (including shrews, grasshopper mice, bats).

Scorpions feed mainly on insects and spiders and can survive without feeding for six months.

Most of the scorpions that enter dwellings are not poisonous; their sting is similar to that of bees or wasps. It's usually better to assume that they are poisonous if you are unsure.

Scorpions have a long slender body with a five-segmented tail that can be arched over the back. Size varies between the various scorpion species, but most measure about 2 inches when fully grown. Their colors range from yellow, blue, reddish brown and black.

The Bark Scorpion is very venomous. If stung, call your local poison control center and go to the nearest hospital or personal physician for treatment. The venom of this scorpion may produce severe pain and swelling at the site of the sting, numbness, frothing at the mouth, difficulty in breathing (including respiratory paralysis), muscle twitching, and convulsions.

Signs

During the day scorpions hide under stones, in piles of rocks, in cracks in masonry, in wood piles and under the bark of trees.

Scorpions enter structures seeking water and shelter. If you have smaller insects in your home such as crickets and cockroaches, this may be a sign of a scorpion infestation. These smaller insects are the food that scorpions like to prey on. That means there is more of a chance of scorpions coming into your home to snatch of these insects, and they will, more likely than not, come back for more.

Trapping Tips

Although general pesticides do not do much in the way of stopping scorpions from entering your home, it can help to get rid of the smaller bugs that act as a food source.

Glue traps can be placed near cracks and crevices, wall voids, electrical fittings, around doors and window frames to catch scorpions.

Remove outdoor harborages such as piles of trash, stones, boards, firewood on the ground and landscape timbers.

Points of entry into buildings should be sealed. Caulking may be applied around entry points in siding, windows, doors, pipes and wires.

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Available from Kness

Stick-All® Glue Trap Products Stick-All® Glue Trap

Ultimate in glue trap for pest control. Attracts, monitors and catches multiple mice and insects.

View Stick-All® Glue Traps